Versatility is on the other side of volatility - J.P. Morgan Asset Management
CLOSE

Versatility is on the other side of volatility

Consider these solutions designed to help generate income in a volatile world.



Hear from our experts on why income requires active

The best portfolios stand strong when the markets don’t

See the impacts of COVID-19 on client portfolios and individual investments.

 

STRESS TEST PORTFOLIOS NOW Stress test individual investments  

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH INVESTING: The price of securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of a fund’s securities goes down, an investment in a fund decreases in value.

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH INVESTING IN THE FUNDS: The following risks could cause the fund to lose money or perform more poorly than other investments. For more complete risk information, see the prospectus. Investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally drops.

JPMorgan Ultra-Short Income ETF (JPST): Income from investments in municipal securities is exempt from federal income tax. The risk of a municipal obligation generally depends on the financial and credit status of the issuer. International investing involves a greater degree of risk and increased volatility. Changes in currency exchange rates and differences in accounting and taxation policies outside the U.S. can raise or lower returns. Also, some overseas markets may not be as politically and economically stable as the United States and other nations. Emerging markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors as well as increased volatility and decreased trading volume. The value of investments in mortgage-related and asset-backed securities will be influenced by the factors affecting the housing market and the assets underlying such securities. The securities may decline in value, face valuation difficulties, become more volatile and/or become illiquid. They are also subject to prepayment risk, which occurs when mortgage holders refinance or otherwise repay their loans sooner than expected, creating an early return of principal to holders of the loans. The Fund will likely engage in active and frequent trading leading to increased portfolio turnover, higher transaction costs, and the possibility of increased capital gains. Securities rated below investment grade are considered “high-yield,” “non-investment grade,” “below investment-grade,” or “junk bonds.” They generally are rated in the fifth or lower rating categories of Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service. Although they can provide higher yields than higher rated securities, they can carry greater risk.

JPMorgan Ultra-Short Municipal Income ETF (JMST) and JPMorgan Municipal ETF (JMUB): The income from municipal securities is exempt from federal income tax. The risk of a municipal obligation generally depends on the financial and credit status of the issuer. For some investors, income may be subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax. Capital gains, if any, are federally taxable. Income may be subject to state and local taxes. All fixed income ETFs Investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally drops. Diversification may not protect against market loss. The ETFs are actively managed and there is no guarantee they will achieve their investment objective. Actively managed funds typically charge more than index-linked products.

JPMorgan Income Fund: Securities rated below investment grade are considered “high-yield,” “non-investment grade,” “below investment grade,” or “junk bonds.” They generally are rated in the fifth or lower rating categories of Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service. Although they can provide higher yields than higher rated securities, they can carry greater risk. International investing has a greater degree of risk and increased volatility due to political and economic instability of some overseas markets. Changes in currency exchange rates and different accounting and taxation policies outside the U.S. can affect returns.

Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk. If rates increase, the value of the Funds’ investments generally declines. The risk of defaults is generally higher in the case of subprime mortgage-related and asset-backed securities that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The structure of some of these securities may be complex and there may be less available information than other types of debt securities. These securities that may or may not be guaranteed by governments and their agencies, supranational organizations, corporations, or banks. The value of these assets will be influenced by factors affecting the assets underlying such securities. During periods of declining asset values, the asset-backed securities may decline in value. Futures contracts, swaps, options and derivatives often create leverage, thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Emerging markets and foreign/international securities involve special risks, including economic, political and currency instability, especially in emerging markets. The Funds’ investments in emerging markets could lead to more volatility in the value of the Funds’ shares. The small size of securities markets and the low trading volume may lead to a lack of liquidity, which leads to increased volatility. Emerging markets may not provide adequate legal protection for private or foreign investment or private property. Securities rated below investment grade (i.e., “high yield” or “junk bonds”) are generally rated in the fifth or lower rating categories of Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service. Although these securities tend to provide higher yields than higher-rated securities, there is a greater risk that the Funds’ share prices will decline. Short sales: There is no guarantee that the use of long and short positions will succeed in limiting the Funds’ exposure to domestic stock market movements, capitalization, sector swings or other risk factors. Investment in a portfolio involved in long and short selling may have higher portfolio turnover rates. This will likely result in additional tax consequences. Short selling involves certain risks, including additional costs associated with covering short positions and a possibility of unlimited loss on certain short sale positions. Investments in equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. When the value of a fund’s securities goes down, an investment in a fund decreases in value. The income from municipal securities is exempt from federal income tax. The risk of a municipal obligation generally depends on the financial and credit status of the issuer. For some investors, income may be subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax. Capital gains, if any, are federally taxable. Income may be subject to state and local taxes.

JPMorgan Income Builder Fund: The prices of equity securities are sensitive to a wide range of factors, from economic to company-specific news, and can fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably, causing an investment to decrease in value. Investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally drops. Investments in derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments. They may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments. Many derivatives create leverage, which could lead to greater volatility and losses that significantly exceed the original investment.

JPMorgan Equity Income Fund: The prices of equity securities are sensitive to a wide range of factors, from economic to company-specific news, and can fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably, causing an investment to decrease in value. There is no guarantee that companies will declare, continue to pay or increase dividends. Growth Advantage Fund: Small-capitalization investments typically carry more risk than investments in well-established “blue-chip” companies since smaller companies generally have a higher risk of failure. Historically, smaller companies’ stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock. Hedged Equity Fund: The prices of equity securities are sensitive to a wide range of factors, from economic to company-specific news, and can fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably, causing an investment to decrease in value. Utilizing a strategy with a diversified equity portfolio and derivatives, with a Put/Spread Collar options overlay, may not provide greater market protection than other equity investments nor reduce volatility to the desired extent, as unusual market conditions or the lack of a ready option market could result in losses. Derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation and the Fund may not realize intended benefits due to underperformance. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the risk being hedged.

JPMorgan Equity Premium Income: The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. Equity securities are subject to “stock market risk,” meaning that stock prices in general (or in particular, the prices of the types of securities in which a fund invests) may decline over short or extended periods of time. When the value of a Fund’s securities goes down, an investment in a Fund decreases in value. The Fund may invest in derivatives that may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage that can cause the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives.